Minutes of the Avon Historical Society, 10-3-12

  • 11-1-12: Avon Historical Society November meeting at the Inter-Society

  • 2-6-13: Ship building on the Black River

  • 3-6-13: The Forgotten Battles of 1812 in Ohio

    Minutes of the Avon Historical Society, 10-3-12

    President Jack Smith called the October 3, 2012, meeting of the Avon Historical Socie ty to order at 7:05 p.m. There were 22 members and guests present.

    A motion was made by Nancy McGee and seconded by Thersa Szippl to approve the minutes of the meeting on 9-5-12 as published.

    Christine White gave the Treasurer's Report stating a balance of $5908.84 in the checking account.

    Current membership dues received total $564.50. Special thanks to Ron Larson for the generous donation included with his dues payment. No outstanding bills to present.

    Old Business:

    Ralph White gave a brief update to the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The Commission had approved a request for demolition of a garage and out building located on Detroit Road between the Jameson barn and the old Avon Hardware building. Ralph also mentioned the need for a secretary for the Commission. No further updates given.

    There was discussion regarding the Candlelight Walk festivities. Jack asked Jean Fischer to purchase 250 juice boxes for snacks with Santa. Fran Burik agreed to pick them up from Jean and transport to the Avon Isle.

    Jack introduced Fran Burik from the French Creek Development Association to talk about the Candlelight Walk.

    On Saturday, November 3 at 1:00 pm, Becky Rink will provide a demonstration on Gingerbread House making at the Old Town Hall of 1871.

    On Friday, November 30, the merchants are sponsoring a Wine Walk.

    There will be a Gingerbread House Contest at the Old Town Hall on Saturday, December 1, from 11-4. Volunteers are needed in the Hall during this time.

    Santa's Stroll begins at 5:00, continuing with the lighting of the tree in the gazebo and ending at the Avon Isle.

    Contact Fran if you would like to volunteer to bake cookies to be passed out to the children visiting Santa at the Isle. Volunteers are also needed at the Isle to help pass out drinks and cookies. Other activities include cookie decorating crafts. For more information go to Frenchcreekdev.com or www.avonhistory.org and click on "what's new".

    Both Theresa and Nancy made several suggestions to Fran based on their previous experiences with hosting Santa at the Old Town Hall such as forming a "Cedar Point" type line for the children, not passing out cookies until they leave the Isle and to possibly reconsider cooking decorating crafts due to clean up issues and potential dirtying of Santa's suit.

    New Business:

    Jean advised that AHS is the host of this year's Inter-Society dinner at the Carlisle Visitor's Center, beverages provided by AHS. 6 volunteers are needed to be at Carlisle at 4:30 to assist with set up. The program will be presented by Jim Smith: the Election of 1912. (See below.)

    The Avon Historical Society's Christmas Party will be held at the home of Jean Fischer, 2940 Stoney Ridge Road, on Saturday, December 15, 2012, at 4:00 pm. Bring an appetizer or dessert to share. Beverages are provided. There is parking in Jean's driveway, next door in Rose Mitock's driveway, or on the east side of Stoney Ridge Road. Call Jean at 934-6106 for more information.

    George Bliss moved for adjournment. Jim Szippl seconded. Jack concluded the meeting at 7:29 pm.

    Stan Hawryluk introduced the speakers Steve Korpos and Mike from the Midwest Railway Preservation Society presenting "Cleveland's Railroad History".

    Respectfully submitted, Christine White, Acting Secretary

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    11-1-12: Avon Historical Society November meeting at the Inter-Society

    The Avon Historical Society will meet at 5:30 pm (dinner at 6:00) on Thursday, 11-1-12, at the annual meeting of the Intersociety of the Lorain County Historical Society (LCHS), at the Lorain County Metroparks Carlisle Reservation Visitor Center, 12882 Diagonal Road, LaGrange, Ohio 44050, west of S.R. 301. Jim Smith, LCHS Education Coordinator, will present "The Election of 1912: The Year of the Bull Moose." For more information, contact Jean Fischer at 934-6106 or Stan Hawryluk at 934-0224.

    "The Election of 1912: The Year of the Bull Moose"

    By Jim Smith, Lorain County Historical Society Education Coordinator

    Teddy Roosevelt wants his Oval Office back. William Howard Taft won't give it up; and Woodrow Wilson takes advantage of the Republican split to win the presidency.

    Jim will show images from 1912 and from the lives of all three of these famous American presidents, including Lorain County's connection to the Progressive Era.

    Representatives of ALL Historical or Genealogical Groups throughout Lorain County are Invited to Attend -- and Tell What Your Group has been Doing Lately!

    Bring a dish to share, your own place service, and beverage -- coffee will be provided.

    Jeff Sigsworth wrote:

    As I told Jean Fischer recently at another meeting, all Avon has to do as host group is to provide a small "crew" of maybe 4-6 people to set up and clean up the food and beverage tables (and kitchen area).

    The host group generally supplies one or several beverages (coffee, iced tea, lemonade, pop, etc.) and cups -- there is a coffee urn in the kitchen -- and sometimes extra paper products or plastic ware (for those who forget). Some groups have provided placemats (for 50-60 seats), but that's optional.

    I believe the set up starts as early as 4:30 or 4:45. There are extra tables and chairs stored in a large "closet" next to the kitchen, if needed.

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    Matt Weisman from the Black River Historical Society will present "Ship building on the Black River," at the meeting of the Avon Historical Society at 7 pm on Wednesday, 2-6-13, at the Old Town Hall of 1871, southeast corner of Detroit and Stoney Ridge. For more information, contact Jean Fischer at 934-6106 or Stan Hawryluk at 934-0224.

    www.cabbs.org/pages/activities_Jan.html

    Matt Weisman grew up in Lorain and has very carefully studied the history of shipbuilding on the Black River.

    The Black River was first seen by white Europeans, the French voyagers, in 1533. The opening of the Western Reserve following the Revolutionary War brought in a few settlers. The early settlers noted they could hear the guns across the water from the British and American ships engaged in the Battle of Lake Erie in September, 1813.

    At the time the settlement was known as Black River. It was later called Charleston, and became Lorain in 1873. The first bridge over the Black River was built that same year.

    The first wooden ship was built in 1818 and they were produced until 1910. The region was a very good source for timber. The river was deep enough for the required draft and labor was plentiful. Most boats were schooners, barks or scows.

    The Onoko was the first steel hulled boat built and was used to haul iron ore. Superior City was the first boat built by American Shipbuilding in 1898.

    During World War One a number of liberty ships were built. These were quickly built freighters with their bridge in the central area of the ship ...

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    AVON HISTORICAL SOCIETY PROPOSED AGENDA, February 6, 2013

    I. Reading of the minutes of the meeting of October 3, 2012

    II. Treasurer's Report

    A. Any outstanding bills to present.

    III. Old Business

    A. Landmarks Preservation Commission report, Ralph White

    B. You are invited to the Avon Isle on 2-20-13 at 7 pm. to discuss the 2014 Avon Bicentennial

    Here are some Bicentennial Ideas:

    Bicentennial calendar could feature families / settlers of Avon

    Civil War Reenactment done at the Avon Isle site

    Have Westlake Historical Society President come and talk to the LPC about what they did for their bicentennial celebration

    Bicentennial Parade

    Genealogy of Avon families

    Home tours

    Church tours

    monthly activities

    banners featuring Avon families hung on telephone poles throughout the City

    cemetery tours

    historic photos printed onto large panels as done by Ron Larsen at the Olde Avon Village;

    self guided tours

    workshops on restoration

    lectures

    use the Avon Isle site; historic costumes dance

    settler's events like splitting logs contest.

    Bicentennial calendar could feature families / settlers of Avon

    Civil War Reenactment done at the Avon Isle site

    Have Westlake Historical Society President come and talk about what they did for their bicentennial celebration

    The new Avon swimming pool which will be located in the vicinity behind the Avon Police Department could be a Bicentennial project. The access road could be lined with trees.

    The baseball field park near Ridgeland and Detroit could be planted with trees.

    Historical reenactments would be of interest to people.

    The Duct Tape Festival for 2014 could have a Bicentennial theme: "Pioneer Days." Various groups could be in historic clothing: military uniforms, baseball uniforms, firemen gear, etc.

    The Avon baseball team "The Crushers" could get involved and wear Bicentennial themes uniforms.

    The Avon schools are currently developing a logo for the Bicentennial.

    There could be a beauty pageant this year (2013); and the winner could be a spokesperson for the Bicentennial, promoting it at events such as Pioneer Days and Yankee Peddler shows.

    There could be a vintage clothing fashion show.

    There could be a Square / Line Dance that could involve Avon senior citizens.

    Create a "Landmarks Preservation Commission 2014 Honor Award" for a landmark. The criteria could be for a landmark that has added an appropriate addition.

    The LPC involvement should focus on (preservation) education.

    Pie baking / cookie / bakery contest and/or a bake sale.

    C. __________________________________________

    IV. New Business

    A. Program for 3-6-13, Jean Fischer

    B. __________________________________________

    V. Motion to Adjourn and Second

    Jean Fischer will introduce Matt Weisman from the Black River Historical Society who will present "Ship building on the Black River."

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    The Minutes of 10-3-12 may be read at http://www.avonhistory.org/histmin/3oct12.htm

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    Parking for meetings of the Avon Historical Society:

    On the east side of the Old Town Hall,

    Across Detroit Rd. at Nemo's Restaurant (park close to Colorado),

    Across Colorado Avenue (SR 611) behind Blue Chip,

    On the east side of Buck's Hardware on Church Street,

    Across Stoney Ridge at Lois Shinko's Country Store parking lot (just south of the Gazebo).

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    Matt Weisman from the Black River Historical Society will present "Ship building on the Black River," at the meeting of the Avon Historical Society at 7 pm on Wednesday, 2-6-13, at the Old Town Hall of 1871, southeast corner of Detroit and Stoney Ridge. For more information, contact Jean Fischer at 934-6106 or Stan Hawryluk at 934-0224.

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    Matt Weisman from the Black River Historical Society will present "The Forgotten Battles of 1812 in Ohio," at the meeting of the Avon Historical Society at 7 pm on Wednesday, 3-6-13, at the Old Town Hall of 1871, southeast corner of Detroit and Stoney Ridge. For more information, contact Jean Fischer at 934-6106 or Stan Hawryluk at 934-0224.

    Mr. Weisman will review the British Invasion into Sandusky and the Battle of Fort Stephenson (which later became Freemont, Ohio) and how it affected the war in the Old Northwest.

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Stephenson

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Meigs

    August 2, 1813 -- Unsuccessful British attack on Fort Stephenson (Fremont, Ohio))

    Fort Meigs was a fortification along the Maumee River in Ohio during the War of 1812. It is named in honor of Ohio governor Return J. Meigs, Jr., for his support in providing General William Henry Harrison with militia and supplies for the line of forts along the Old Northwest frontier.

    Battle of Fort Stephenson

    Belligerents

    Great Britain (Major General Henry Procter), Tecumseh's confederacy

    United States (Major George Croghan)

    Strength

    1,400 British regulars and Indians

    160 U.S. regulars

    Casualties and losses

    British -- 26 killed, 41 wounded, 29 missing

    United States -- 1 killed, 7 wounded

    Forts and battles on the Detroit frontier -- Tippecanoe, Fort Mackinac, Brownstown, Maguaga, Fort Dearborn, Detroit, Fort Harrison, Fort Wayne, Wild Cat Creek, Mississinewa, Frenchtown, Fort Meigs, Fort Stephenson, Lake Erie, Thames, Longwoods, Prairie du Chien, Mackinac Island, Lake Huron, Malcolm's Mills

    The Battle of Fort Stephenson was an American victory during the War of 1812.

    Background

    After failing to defeat American forces in the siege of Fort Meigs, the British under Henry Procter withdrew. Procter attempted to take Fort Meigs again in July by staging a mock battle to lure the defenders out of the fort. The ploy failed, and Procter abandoned the idea of taking the fort. The British and Indian force moved on to capture an American supply base on the Sandusky River guarded by Fort Stephenson (where Fremont, Ohio stands today).

    The fort was commanded by Major George Croghan with a garrison of 160 U.S. Regulars (17th U.S. Infantry-later consolidated into US 3rd Infantry Regiment) under his command.

    William Henry Harrison, the U.S. commander of the Northwest Frontier, believed Procter's force to be larger than it was and ordered Croghan to destroy the fort and withdraw. Croghan insisted that he could hold the fort and stayed. Harrison agreed to let Croghan stay, but still fearing the worst he moved all available forces 10 miles away from Fort Stephenson.

    Battle

    Expecting Harrison to be moving to Fort Stephenson's aid, Procter had no intentions of conducting a siege as he had at Fort Meigs. The British artillery and gunboats began shelling the fort but with little effect. On August 2, Procter ordered an infantry assault. Croghan ordered the defenders to hold fire until the attackers were within close range. Once within range, the garrison opened fired along with the fort's artillery.

    The attack fell back, and Procter tried and failed several more times. Lacking scaling ladders, Procter finally realized that the attackers could do very little against the fort. Procter called off the attack, and the Indians returned to the field late at night to carry away the wounded. The attack on Fort Stephenson had failed, causing heavy British losses and forcing their retreat to Canada.

    Five currently active units of the Regular Army (1-3 Inf, 2-3 Inf, 4-3 Inf, 2-7 Inf and 3-7 Inf) perpetuate the lineages of the old 17th and 24th Infantry Regiments, both of which had elements that were engaged at Fort Stephenson.

    Results

    The battle had been a victory for the Americans. George Croghan emerged from the battle as a hero and was promoted to lieutenant colonel. Both Procter and Harrison suffered criticism for their parts in the battle. The British as well as Tecumseh were growing increasingly aware of Procter's shortcomings.

    Harrison was criticised for not making a whole-hearted effort to come to the fort's aid. Yet the British had been defeated, and Procter withdrew to Canada. In the following months, the Americans won decisive victories at the battles of Lake Erie and the Thames.

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