Avon Growth News, 7-21-05 to Present

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7-21-05 Stone Eagle Farm

7-23-05 Will Westlake close Avon Road?

7-25-05 Bus Garage Press Release

8-10-05 Jax comes to Olde Avon Village

8-11-05 Avon City Council is following the rules

From LorainCounty.com:

Bus Garage

Written by Oldtimer on July 28, 2005 5:41 PM

``Storing 42 busses along the west side of Heritage North is a menace to the health of Avon children. The wind is usually from a westerly direction, and it will blow deadly diesel pollution into the school.

School busses should not be stored at Heritage North. When these busses warm up in the morning, clouds of tiny particles from the diesel engines will fill the air. These tiny particles have been shown to be the cause of the asthma epidemic which is sweeping the country. These particles also cause lung cancer. The life of just one Avon student is worth more than any financial saving from storing the busses at Heritage North.

The deadly tiny particles of diesel pollution will blow into the school through even the smallest crevice. These particles will accumulate in Heritage North. The kids will breathe them in when they get there. After they get off the busses at Heritage North, they will breathe in these deadly particles all day long, day after day, inside the school.

The only way these particles will leave the school is on the clothes and in the lungs of students and staff. The concentration of these particles will rise until as many are being added to the air in the school each day as are leaving in or on people. Little brothers and sisters at home will be contaminated.

From www.harvard-magazine.com/on-line/050543.html:

Joseph Brain is the Director of the Harvard School of Public Health's Center for Environmental Health: "Lung diseases like cancer, emphysema, fibrosis, and asthma are almost all initiated or aggravated by the inhalation of particles and gases, says Center director Joseph Brain ..."

Ultra-fine or nanosized particles can be the same size as molecules in the body. These may actually enter the bloodstream by crossing the alveolar membrane or by passing between cells that make up the alveolar wall ...

As we have become more sophisticated in our epidemiologic studies, it has become clear that the concept 'that there is a safe level at which you can protect everybody in the public against health effects' is not holding up. There are detectable health effects at even the lowest levels ..."''

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Written by: Oldtimer on July 30, 2005 11:41 AM

``If the school board fails to perform due diligence regarding the health effects of storing diesel busses at Heritage North, the taxpayers of Avon will be at risk. How much will a court grant for the treatment of a lifetime of asthma and for the pain and suffering of a child? The school board will not be able to plead ignorance.

After several years of storing school busses on the west side of Heritage North, what will be the cost to the taxpayers of decontaminating the school? Would it exceed the cost of a major asbestos removal? Where will the students go while the school is being decontaminated?

What happens to the expensive bus garage at Heritage North if, after several years, the school must be decontaminated? Will the taxpayers be forced to pay for another bus garage far from any school?

The school board seems to have determined that 42 busses will serve an Avon population of about 15,000. How many busses will have to be stored at Heritage North when Avon has a build-out population of 74,000?

The time to do the right thing is now, before Avon is committed to an expensive disaster.''

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Bus Garage

Written by justmyopinion on August 3, 2005 8:34 PM

``I used to think that the concerns of Oldtimer were a little "out there". However, I did some research; and he makes some valid points. These particles that come from the fuel have been labeled cacinogens by the EPA and have been known to cause ashtma and cancer in children.

There was a major law suite filed in Shelby township, MI regarding the effect fumes had on the death of a resident that neighbored a school bus garage. The case was settled out of court but got national attention.

The problem may not be as bad as old timer suggests; but it is certainly an issue and should not be dismissed. The bus facillity will be surrounded by mounding in addition to the westerly winds; and the fumes will be funelled in the direction of the school. Just one of many concerns I found that I have with the buses at Heritage.

Do some searching on the internet for school bus garage and bus fumes etc. ... You'll be suprised many in the education profession oppose buses being placed next to a school.''

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NEWS ARTICLE from The Morning Journal, 7-21-05, by SCOT ALLYN, Morning Journal Writer

``Avon gets plan for 'Burger King of the future'

AVON -- The old and the new vied for attention at the Avon Planning Commission meeting last night [7-20-05].

Informal presentations for a new kind of Burger King at Healthway Drive and Detroit Road and an interior design business to occupy the historic Stone Eagle Farm elicited much response from a large audience.

Tom Tomsik, architect for Michael Showalter of Franchise Operations Inc., showed drawings for a Burger King that Showalter characterized as a ''prototype.''

Showalter, who said his company runs 23 other Burger Kings in greater Cleveland, explained that the Avon restaurant would be a departure. ''It will be the first of its kind in Ohio,'' he said. ''It will be more family oriented, with televisions showing news and sports in the dining room, and kids' shows in the playground,'' he explained. He added that wireless Internet access would be available in the dining room, which would seat 80. ''It will be the Burger King of the future,'' he said.

The restaurant ''will harmonize with the French Creek District,'' said Tomsik, referring to the exterior design. ''It will have awnings like the French Creek Shopping Center, a cupola like a church, and a brick and siding motif,'' said Tomsik. The Burger King circular trademark would still be prominent above the front entrance, he added.

Timothy Nickum, City Council's representative on the Planning Commission, said he wants the entrance to be off Healthway Drive instead of Detroit Road to avoid more congestion on that road ...

The commission also heard from Jeff and Carolyn Hammerschmidt, who want a special use permit for the Stone Eagle Farm, 33065 Detroit Road. A private residence since it was erected by the Hurst family in the 1840s, it has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1974.

The Hammerschmidts hope to purchase the property and install an interior design studio, offices and floor space to sell home furnishings. ''It's a treasured landmark, and we need to find some way to preserve it,'' said Jeff Hammerschmidt.'' ...

George Bliss, who lives next door to the property, explained that it has been vacant for several years, when the last resident, Gladys Tomes, left for a nursing home. Bliss said he liked the Hammerschmidts' plan, but did not want to see commercial development start in his neighborhood. ''Detroit Road must never become another Lorain Road,'' he said.

Jack Smith, president of the Avon Historical Society, said the planning commission's decision on the Stone Eagle Farm ''affects the entire east side of Avon, and how cars get to I-90.'' Smith said Napa Blvd., a proposed north-south thoroughfare that would border the farm, could be affected by the Hammerschmidts' plans.

Smith added that the advantage of a special-use permit, if granted to the Hammerschmidts, ''is that it goes with the owners, not the property.'' If the owners sell the property, he explained, Stone Eagle would revert to ordinary residential use. ''They should keep in mind [when restoring the house] it could be a home again someday,''...''

[According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Avon picked up 1,048 residents, starting in 2003, to reach a new total of 14,880 by July, 2004. Mayor James A. Smith said 370 homes were built in Avon during 2004.

To put this into perspective, we should look at the 1992 Avon Master Plan, submitted to Mayor Pearl Olearcik on 7-23-92 by Metro One Design Group Inc. On page 28, Metro One calculates that Avon's 7627 acres of R1 (single family) zoned land will produce a build-out population of 58,333; there will be a total build-out population from all residentialy zoned land of 74,156.

On page 16, Metro One recommends that 4470 acres of Avon's R1 land be changed to R1WR (R1 Western Reserve) with a minimum lot size of two acres. At build-out, R1 would have 24,144 people; R1WR would have 6884 people; and there would be a total build-out population from all residentialy zoned land of 44,754.

No R1 land has been given mandatory R1WR zoning, although R1WR is a rarely used voluntary option. Thus Avon's build-out population, without a massive rezoning of Detroit Rd. to commercial and R3 (multi-family), will be about 74,000 according to Metro One.

Avon has an area of 20.9 square miles. Parma has an area of 20.8 square miles and a 2004 population of 87,000; So, if you think traffic is bad with an Avon population of about 15,000, just wait. Remember, Parma was built on a grid. With the exception of Northgate, many of Avon's developments are almost impenetrable mazes.]

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NEWS ARTICLE from The Press, 6-29-05, By Julie A. Short

``Westlake considers vacating portion of Avon Road

AVON -- The rumblings have been heard for more than two years, but things are getting a little louder to the east as Westlake city officials are strongly considering vacating the city's portion of Avon Road, which would close off traffic to and from both municipalities.

"I don't believe there is anything definite right now, "Ward 5 Westlake Councilman Ken Brady said. "There is a housing development before our planning commission tonight (June 27, 2005) along Detroit Road extending to Avon Road near the Avon Oaks Country Club. The access to the development will be off Detroit Road. Our intent is to possibly vacate Avon Road. If that happens, the road would be a private drive for those residents." ...

"Westlake never planned for Avon Road to be a major route," Brady. "We would like people to utilize Detroit Road. Avon Road is not a cut through. Westlake is looking to widen Detroit Road in the future, but nothing is definite on that right now." [Is closing Avon Road another excuse for trashing Detroit Road?]

Brady would like to see the mayors and city councils from both cities sit down and discuss how both cities can better deal with traffic issues. "I understand Avon is still considering an interchange off I-90," he said. "This would alleviate some of our traffic issues."

Avon Mayor Jim Smith sent a letter to Westlake Mayor Dennis Clough on June 27 [2005] stating his concerns ...''

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Avon School Board Members:

Angie Marsiglia 934-6767, AJKJ@aol.com

Deborah Polovich 937-5298, DPolovich@aol.com

Ruth Keller 937-5221, rakeller@centurytel.net

Susan Harrison 937-5850, avonkennels@msn.com

Dale Smitek 934-6919, DSmitek@aol.com

PRESS RELEASE from JoAnne Easterday, Avon Council-at-large, 7-25-05

``The safety of our children should be the most important consideration in the discussion of the Avon School bus garage. Numerous authorities and studies have pointed out that particles from idling diesel exhaust are the cause of respiratory distress, especially in children.

This question was raised by Councilman Tim Nickum during a council meeting regarding the bus garage. Little or no consideration was given at that time and only the Sun newspaper reported that portion of the discussion.

The Healthy School Handbook, published by the National Education Association Professional Library states that the idling bus exhaust fill and contaminate the school grounds, corridors and classrooms with toxic fumes.

The safety of children in this case was never addressed by the School Board, by the Planning Commission nor some members of the Avon City government.

Although printed information was available and was thought to have been presented to Council, it was never seen until July 23.

The school bus garage and storage acreage should not be at the Heritage School site. The particulate particles associated with diesel fuel will be deposited on the school grounds and walkways and drawn into the school with foot traffic and the prevailing west winds.

The fumes from the buses, which the drivers said have to be warmed in winter months, and the fumes from ongoing work on disabled buses are likely not to dissipate readily. The proposed mound would trap and contain the exhaust fumes and particulates in the school areas. With the prevailing westerly winds, the mound could funnel the exhaust fumes into the front door of the school.

Although it may be a necessary risk that children will have minimum exposure to bus fumes at curb side while waiting to board buses in the neighborhoods, it would never be the intent to exacerbate the situation by concentrating the fumes in one area.

Society has become more enlightened over the years regarding common practices and health concerns; therefore, the schools have an opportunity to make an even safer environment by locating the school bus garage in a more distant location.

In an article from Harvard Magazine, May-June 2005, describing "How epidemiology, engineering, and experiment finger fine particles as airborne killers" it says "...these fine particles deposit far down in the gas exchange regions known as the deep lung."

In another portion of the Harvard Magazine under research at the Harvard School of Public Health, Joseph Brain, Drinker professor of environmental physiology states, "Lung diseases like cancer, emphysema, fibrosis, and asthma are almost all initiated or aggravated by the inhalation of particles and gases."

The article continues, "We know if you have a mom and her seven-year-old standing at a bus stop and they get a blast of diesel exhaust, the child is going to get relatively much greater particle deposition. Because of differences in surface to lung volume, metabolic rate, and activity, the seven-year old's lungs will get two and a half times the dose of particles as the mother's lungs." This 12 page article can be read at www.harvard-magazine.com/on-line/050543.html:

The Asthma Regional Council writes in a sample newsletter, "While school buses are a safe and effective way to transport children to and from school, they emit pollution. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), exposure to school bus diesel exhaust, even at low levels, is a health hazard that can aggravate respiratory problems such as asthma and bronchitis and possibly increase the risk of lung damage." This information may be researched at http://www.asthmaregionalcouncil.org

The American Lung Association of California states the following, "Studies have shown that the proximity of a child's school or home to major roads may be linked to asthma, and the severity of children's asthmatic symptoms increases with proximity to truck traffic."

It could be inferred from this that a bus garage and storage area which would create a concentration of toxic fumes should not be in close proximity of a child's school or home. The information was taken from http://www/californialung.org/spotlight/diesel_health.html

Other web sites can be accessed at http://www.epa.gov/ne/eco/diesel/school_buses.html ''

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR of The Press, 7-13-05, by Kristy Rice

Bus Garage

To the Editor:

``We have heard for the past few weeks much back and forth regarding the new school bus garage the school board wants to build at the Avon Heritage School. Please take a minute to hear from those of us who live in front of the location where the buses are currently stored. Then you, as a fellow resident who may live near the new school, might take up the cause to spare this atrocity.

When you live in front/side/behind a bus garage and you dare open your windows early on a summer morning your ears are assaulted with the raucous noise of dozens of buses idling, the dank smell of their burning fuel, and the obnoxious beeping as they are backing up.

I can only imagine how these things would be amplified as they carry across the green space surrounding the school. After you have the proper mental picture/sounds/smells in place, imagine you cannot exit or enter your own driveway (or development) due to the long line of buses blockading the street in both directions.

Imagine having to plan your day around the bus schedule so you can make certain you are able to make an appointment on time. Everyday. All week. Nine months a year. This is what will happen to all those in the developments and homes around Avon Heritage if the school board builds their bus garage in front of the school.

And then what happens as the City of Avon grows and more buses are required? Will they build another garage opposite this one so that when you pull into the school you drive through two maintenance garages? That is a pretty picture with double the noises, smells and congestion.

The bottom line is that the buses are going to be moved (and we who live in front of Avon Middle School are thankful) but be forwarned if they place this monstrosity in your front/back/side yard.

Call the school board president, Angie Marsiglia, today at 937-4680 and ask her to resume the talks they cut off with the city regarding the bus garage location. Also, call city hall today for your city council representative's phone number (937-7800) and let them know you support their desire to look at all the available options not just the Heritage location.

For those of you who said, "I don't live near the school, it has nothing to do with me" keep in mind that the a legal precedent will be set to support any developer who demands city council rezone from residential to commercial to put an ugly strip mall in your front yard. Let's just take dozens of Lorain Road strip malls in North Olmstead and drop them in at the intersection of 83 and Detroit.

Might as well mention your thoughts on that to council too, when you call. Our city council is acting wisely to look at all the options and that should be commended instead of allowing the school board to fund this eyesore with your most recent tax levy increase -- that's right -- all Avon homeowners will be paying for it!

We need to act now to support council in their quest to adequately consider all the options. Otherwise, say goodbye to quiet, peaceful mornings and hello to planning life around the school bus schedule and ugly strip malls.''

Kristy Rice, Avon

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR of The Press, 8-4-05, by Taylor J. Smith

``In The Press, 8-3-05, bus garage article, the snippet attributed to me needs some context: School busses should not be stored at Heritage North. When these busses warm up in the morning, clouds of tiny particles from the diesel engines will fill the air. These tiny particles have been shown to be the cause of the asthma epidemic which is sweeping the country. These particles also cause lung cancer. The life of just one Avon student is worth more than any financial saving from storing the busses at Heritage North.

The deadly tiny particles of diesel pollution will blow into the school through even the smallest crevice. These particles will accumulate in Heritage North. The kids will breathe them in when they get there. After they get off the busses at Heritage North, they will breathe in these deadly particles all day long, day after day, inside the school.

The only way these particles will leave the school is on the clothes and in the lungs of students and staff. The concentration of these particles will rise until as many are being added to the air in the school each day as are leaving in or on people. Little brothers and sisters at home will be contaminated.

I'm surprised by the willingness of the Board of Education to risk incurring substantial liabilities for the taxpayers of Avon. How much will a court grant for the treatment of a lifetime of asthma and for the pain and suffering of a child? The BOE will not be able to plead ignorance.

After several years of storing school busses on the west side of Heritage North, what will be the cost to the taxpayers of decontaminating the school? Would it exceed the cost of a major asbestos removal? Where will the students go while the school is being decontaminated?

What happens to the expensive bus garage at Heritage North if, after several years, the school must be decontaminated? Will the taxpayers be forced to pay for another bus garage far from any school?

The Board of Education seems to have determined that from 36 to 42 busses will serve an Avon population of about 15,000. How many busses will have to be stored at Heritage North when Avon has a build-out population of 74,000?

The time to do the right thing is now, before Avon is committed to an expensive disaster.''

Taylor J. Smith, Avon

More on the Bus Garage

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NEWS ARTICLE from The Press, 8-10-05, By Julie A. Short

``Resort wear clothing store coming to Olde Avon Village

AVON -- It will be summer all year round at Olde Avon Village (36840 Detroit Road) as a men's and women's clothing store offering "resort wear" and summer fashions is gearing up for a fall opening in the newly constructed building within the French Creek District.

Jax, a local fixture in Lorain for more than 53 years, will be moving to the Village and feature men's clothing. Endless Summer, with current locations in Rocky River and Lorain, will be closing the Rocky River location and moving to Avon.

"We're very excited to be bringing our stores to Avon," Merle Beyers said. "We love the area Ron (Larson) has created. It reminds us of where we vacation in Maine. We carry summer merchandise all year so it's like we are always on vacation."

Merle co-owns the stores with her husband, Scott, whom she calls the true "fashion expert." "He's just fabulous," she said. "He has great taste. We enjoy attending clothing shows all over the country in search of unique finds." ...

Merle's father opened Jax as just a men's clothing store. Over the years, the store gradually began to add women's clothes.

"Our stores in Avon will be side-by-side and will have a pass through," Merle said. "When we first opened in Lorain, there was nothing like us around. We were located down by the water so our clientele was folks looking for summer merchandise. Endless Summer is located right at Spitzer Marina and we have a strong following." ...

Customer service is the theme of the Beyers' business practice. "We have awesome employees," Merle said. "We are very customer-oriented. During the snow storm last Christmas we had many customers who were waiting for orders or alterations to be completed so we drove around and hand delivered all the merchandise so the customers could have their gifts or clothing in time for Christmas."

Merle will be dividing her time between the Avon location and the Rocky River Endless Summer store until it closes in January [2006].

As previously reported in the PRESS, also coming to the Village are Littlest Details (a baby/mother-to-be shop), The Pear Tree Gallery (art gallery formerly, known as the Loft) and The Hen and the Ivy (florist/gifts).''

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR of The Press, 8-10-05, by Toni Barnhart

[Avon City Council is following the rules]

``There are currently two developers in Avon, as well as the Avon School Board, that are seeking to change the zoning on property they have purchased or wish to purchase, from residential to commercial or special use. Two are involved in legal action to get the zoning changed, the other has hinted at doing the same.

The City of Avon, in 1992, was on the verge of growth and expansion; and the city put a zoning plan in place to protect the community -- good, long range planning. Certain areas in town would be commercial, others residential, etc. Seems to be they did the prudent thing at the time.

Now, the developers come before the Planning Commission with their plan and the commission gives it's approval. They are aware that the property in question is not zoned for what the developer wants, right? They approve it anyway and off the developer goes to City Council. City Council denies the request for rezoning. What the developer wants doesn't fit the zoning. Shouldn't the Planning Commission stop it there before it gets to council?

Now the developer is unhappy and proceeds to hire an attorney to fight the city. They claim the zoning is 'outdated'. Should the developer win his case and get the zoning changed from commercial to residential, then all bets are off for the rest of the city. Once a precedent has been set, ANYONE can march into Avon, request a change of zoning and get it.

So, what we end up with is a church next to a bar next to car wash next to a department store next to a liquor store next to an apartment complex next to an historic home next to an adult book store next to a day care next to a fast food place -- and on it goes. Is that what we want in Avon? Maybe this is a bit simplistic, but again, once a precedent has been set, the city loses and the developers get to do whatever they want, wherever they want; and we can't stop it.

Avon City Council is following the rules. No other entity, not a developer, not the school board, should be allowed to supercede what the city has put in place to protect our community from becoming a hodge-podge of commercial, special use and residential zoning.''

Antoinette Barnhart, Avon

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OPINION ARTICLE from The Detroit News, 4-25-03, by Todd McInturf

``Utica Schools Must Address Fears about Bus Garage Fumes

Censored high school article raises doubts on safety

In a rapidly growing community such as Shelby Township, deciding on sites for a few necessary but intrusive facilities inevitably causes a commotion.

That is emphatically the case with the bus garage for the Utica Community Schools. Both the current location and a proposed new site have become the focus of discontent.

If the debate weren't divisive enough, heavy-handed actions by the school district and its administrators seem to be making it even worse.

The decision of a high school principal to censor a student journalist [Katherine Dean] who wrote about problems with the current garage site is now headed to court ...

The facility is now situated on 21 Mile and Shelby roads. The district wants to move it to 23 Mile and Hayes roads. But its history has raised some apprehension among its proposed new neighbors.

A family that lives less than 50 feet from the current garage sued the district, claiming that exhaust fumes from the facility had contributed to a death from lung cancer. The suit was settled in January, and the district admitted no wrongdoing in the case ...

But the district needs to be a better neighbor than this. Concerns of the nearby residents are understandable, and they should be addressed in a forthcoming manner.

The previous act of censorship also raises suspicions that the district has something to hide and is not being entirely honest about the effect bus fumes may be having on health ...''

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR of The Sun, 8-11-05, by JoAnne Easterdy

``The safety of our children should be the most important consideration in the discussion of the Avon School bus garage. Numerous authorities and studies have pointed out that particles from idling diesel exhaust are the cause of respiratory distress, especially in children.

This question was raised by Councilman Tim Nickum during a council meeting regarding the bus garage. Little or no consideration was given at that time.

The Healthy School Handbook, published by the National Education Association Professional Library states that the idling bus exhaust fill and contaminate the school grounds, corridors and classrooms with toxic fumes.

The safety of children in this case was never addressed by the School Board, by the Planning Commission nor some members of the Avon City government.

Although printed information was available and was thought to have been presented to Council, it was never seen until July 23. Even more information has come to light regarding the hazards associated with diesel fumes.

As reported in ... a local paper, a study in Avon Lake regarding the high incidents of cancer in that community, was discussed among the residents with city officials and Robert Indian, chief investigator on the Ohio Department of Health's study.

"Construction dust, diesel fumes and dust from building materials" can lead to cancer in children, whose immune systems are more fragile than those in adults," Indian was quoted as saying.

The school bus garage and storage acreage should not be at the Heritage School site. The particulates associated with diesel fuel will be deposited on the school grounds and walkways and drawn into the school with foot traffic and the prevailing west winds.

The fumes from the buses, which the drivers said have to be warmed in winter months, and the fumes from ongoing work on disabled buses, are likely not to dissipate readily. The proposed mound would trap and contain the exhaust fumes and particulate in the school areas. With the prevailing westerly winds, the mound could funnel the exhaust fumes into the front door of the school.

Although it may be a necessary risk that children will have minimum exposure to bus fumes at curb side while waiting to board buses in the neighborhoods, it would never be the intent to exacerbate the situation by concentrating the fumes in one area.

Society has become more enlightened over the years regarding common practices and health concerns; therefore, the schools have an opportunity to make an even safer environment by locating the school bus garage in a more distant location.

In an article from Harvard Magazine, May-June 2005, describing "How epidemiology, engineering, and experiment finger fine particles as airborne killers" it says "...these fine particles deposit far down in the gas exchange regions known as the deep lung."

In another portion of the Harvard Magazine under research at the Harvard School of Public Health, Joseph Brain, Drinker professor of environmental physiology states, "Lung diseases like cancer, emphysema, fibrosis, and asthma are almost all initiated or aggravated by the inhalation of particles and gases."

The article continues, "We know if you have a mom and her seven-year-old standing at a bus stop and they get a blast of diesel exhaust, the child is going to get relatively much greater particle deposition. Because of differences in surface to lung volume, metabolic rate, and activity, the seven-year old's lungs will get two and a half times the dose of particles as the mother's lungs." This 12 page article can be read at www.harvard-magazine.com/on-line/050543.html:

The Asthma Regional Council writes in a sample newsletter, "While school buses are a safe and effective way to transport children to and from school, they emit pollution. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), exposure to school bus diesel exhaust, even at low levels, is a health hazard that can aggravate respiratory problems such as asthma and bronchitis and possibly increase the risk of lung damage." This information may be researched at http://www.asthmaregionalcouncil.org

The American Lung Association of California states the following, "Studies have shown that the proximity of a child's school or home to major roads may be linked to asthma, and the severity of Children's asthmatic symptoms increases with proximity to truck traffic."

It could be inferred from this that a bus garage and storage area which would create a concentration of toxic fumes should not be in close proximity of a child's school or home. The information was taken from http://www/californialung.org/spotlight/diesel_health.html

Other web sites can be accessed at http:www.epa.gov/ne/eco/diesel/school_buses.html''

JoAnne Easterday, Avon council-at-large

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LETTER to The Editor of The Press, 8-19-05, by Taylor J. Smith

``I continue to be surprised by the willingness of the Board of Education to risk incurring substantial liabilities for the taxpayers of Avon. The BOE should not claim without data that there is no threat to the health of our children from storing busses at Heritage North.

The Board of Education should ask the EPA to measure the number of tiny particles of diesel pollution coming out of the tailpipe of each bus at startup to obtain an average. With this information, engineering calculations can be performed to estimate the accumulation of diesel particles in the school over several years. No bids for constructing the bus garage should be solicited until the BOE has performed this due diligence.

Why does the Board of Education refuse to consider the effect of Avon's rapid growth? The BOE seems to have determined that from 36 to 42 busses will serve an Avon population of about 15,000. How many busses will have to be stored at Heritage North when Avon has a build-out population of 74,000? The BOE has been storing busses near Stoney Ridge and Bauerdale for about fifty years. Are we to think that busses will be stored at Heritage North for fifty years?

Again, the time to do the right thing is now, before Avon is committed to an expensive disaster.

Sincerely yours, Taylor J. Smith, Avon

Avon School Board Members:

Angie Marsiglia 934-6767, AJKJ@aol.com

Deborah Polovich 937-5298, DPolovich@aol.com

Ruth Keller 937-5221, rakeller@centurytel.net

Susan Harrison 937-5850, avonkennels@msn.com

Dale Smitek 934-6919, DSmitek@aol.com

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